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CAVEAT EMPTOR: The information contained in this blog post does not constitute a medical endorsement nor does it suggest a substitute for your regular prescribed medication. If you have a medical condition, you MUST consult your doctor. The information provided here is for general reading and you are advised to research further about any topic that might interest you. You shall not hold this writer accountable for any liability and for any indemnification.

© Nyree Conrad Zerega

In my previous post, Breadfruit … my morning chow today I shared my delight of having breadfruit to eat for breakfast. Although I didn’t mention, it was a good relief not eating sweet mooncakes (Mid Autumn Festival was celebrated on 12 Sept 2011) and the sight of a natural source of nutritious fibrous meal was a welcome change.

While searching for more information about this wonder fruit, I also come across numerous reports claiming medicinal properties of this tropical staple. I became particularly interested because I had been suffering from abnormal b.p. and will have to take a long “sabbatical” to nurse my health back. I was particularly drawn to the possibility that tea made from the leaves of the breadfruit tree could help alleviate my problem. I ought to give it a try, albeit carefully of course.

I read from National Tropical Botanical Garden, an article on the uses of the breadfruit tree the following excerpt,
“The breadfruit tree is an important part of the native pharmacopoeia in the Pacific Islands. The latex is massaged into the skin to treat broken bones and sprains and is bandaged on the spine to relieve sciatica. Crushed leaves are commonly used to treat skin ailments and fungus diseases such as ‘thrush’. Diluted latex is taken internally to treat diarrhea, stomachaches, and dysentery. The sap from the crushed stems of leaves is used to treat ear infections or sore eyes. The root is an astringent and used as a purgative; when macerated it is used as a poultice for skin ailments. The bark is also used to treat headaches in several islands. In the West Indies, the yellowing leaf is brewed into tea and taken to reduce high blood pressure and to relieve asthma. The tea is also thought to control diabetes.”

This medicinal property for the treatment for high b.p. is repeated in many articles found on the web. For instance, “Breadfruit leaves are used for high blood pressure. The leaves slightly crushed, are also bound on the head and forehead as a cure for headache,” extracted from Bush Medicine of Belize and Central America and the Carribean. From Botany, The Breadfruit (published by McGraw Hill), it states, ” In the West Indies, the leaf is collected when yellow and brewed into a tea to reduce high blood pressure and control diabetes.”

Of course, more research would have to be done before anyone embarks on using herbal remedies.

CAVEAT EMPTOR: The information contained in this blog post does not constitute a medical endorsement nor does it suggest a substitute for your regular prescribed medication. If you have a medical condition, you MUST consult your doctor. The information provided here is for general reading and you are advised to research further about any topic that might interest you. You shall not hold this writer accountable for any liability and for any indemnification.

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